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Incorporate Ultrasound into Your OVA1® Test Result Interpretation


Combining OVA1 (MIA) with powerful tools like ultrasound can aid in the detection of ovarian cancer. According to a study by Goodrich et al., imaging and the OVA1 (MIA) score work together to better identify patients at higher risk of malignancy.

Screenshot of graph showing OVA1 test results

Results Interpretation


Patients with an elevated risk of malignancy may benefit from a consultation with a gynecologic oncologist.

In the prospective study, Bristow, et al. published a histogram showing the observed risk of malignancy associated with respective OVA1 (MIA) scores for premenopausal and postmenopausal women5:

Graph showing OV1 test cutoff scores for postmenopausal and premenopausal.

Risk of Malignancy


The OVA1 (MIA) and OVERA (MIA2) test scores are reported as a single numeric score on a scale of 0-10.

For premenopausal women, a result of greater than or equal to 5, is associated with an elevated risk of malignancy. Results between 5.0-7.0 will be reflexed to OVERA. For postmenopausal women, an OVA1 (MIA) score of greater than or equal to 4.4 is associated with an elevated risk for malignancy. Results between 4.4-6.0 will be reflexed to OVERA. OVERA results are reported with a score of <5.0 as Low Risk and ≥5.0 as Elevated Risk.

Lower risk:
Risk of malignancy was reported as below 1.4% for premenopausal women and 3.3% for postmenopausal women.

Elevated risk:
Higher risk of malignancy – see graph to the left for representative data from published clinical trial.

Screenshot of graph showing observed risk of malignancy vs OVA1 test.

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Test Performance Measures


Learn about the terminology and performance measures to determine the accuracy of a diagnostic test:

High sensitivity is often determined as the most critical measure of a test because it minimizes the number of patients with the disease that are missed. A highly sensitivity test is generally associated with a strong negative predictive value; this gives providers confidence that a negative test result likely suggests a patient is truly without the disease.

Definitions:

  1. Sensitivity: The percent of patients with a malignant mass who had a positive test result
  2. Specificity: The percent of patients with a benign mass who had a negative test result
  3. Negative predictive value: The percent of patients with a negative test result who had a benign mass
  4. Positive predictive value: The percent of patients with a positive test result who had a malignant mass
  5. False positive: The percent of patients with a positive test result who had a benign mass
  6. False negative: The percent of patients with a negative test result who had a malignant mass